Posts Tagged ‘installation

10
Sep
11

Write a letter today…

It’s a cliche, but it’s true. In the age of Facebook chat and iphone instant messaging, people just don’t take the time to write letters to each other. I try my best to, and I just love receiving letters from friends. The scribbles on the paper, the anticipation as to what’s inside… a handwritten letter is like a flat present.
That’s why I made this.

It’s hanging on the construction perimeter fencing right by the Starbucks at Bank and Third and is packed full of nice envelopes and paper…everything one needs to write letters to friends or loved ones except for a pen and a stamp. Then again most people are bound to have a pen on them. I’m an artist, and bump up the average by having 6 or so in pockets and backpack.

I got the box from Zoom of Knitnut fame, and when I saw it I knew it had to be a mailbox. The thing must have weighed close to 2 kilos when I was done on account of the wood I had to bolt to the back to give the lid enough clearance to open. Go check it out. Take some time to write a few letters. Love each other and the city we live in.

My lovely assistant

What happens when you spend time retracing details on streetart instead of shaving

06
Sep
11

RIP Jack. The Struggle Continues

I went to Parliament Hill to file by Jack Layton’s coffin that Thursday, and it was the makeshift memorial full of cans of Orange Crush, letters of thanks and encouraging messages for the future that left me choked up and wiping tears off my cheeks. The idea of an Elmaks street art memorial piece crossed my mind and didn’t leave. It had to be done. Like most of my ideas, its birth came about in the form of two images. Layton’s mustache and NDP orange. I went looking for material and knew things were looking up when I stumbled upon a half-sheet of 1/2″ plywood behind the local trip mall. This would have to go from idea to finished product in 36 hours- my version of a no-huddle offense.

The most frustrating part of this was laying down Krylon indoor-outdoor gloss finish on top of Montana Black. The latter’s a proper artists’ paint and has a powdery finish, while the former’s gotten worse in terms of its consistency in recent years and sports a ‘tamper proof’ unremovable nozzle that sprays a blotchy wedge pattern which requires at least 2-3 coats even if you’re painting wicker furniture (Even though its cans are useless to proper street artists, Krylon’s cheap and that makes it a good friend of taggers). I laid down 3 coats of orange (10 minute drying time my ass…I spent 1 1/2 hours waiting for each coat to dry) before it hit me that Weld Bond glue could be used as an improvised primer.

Jack Layton wasn’t just a politician, he was an activist and an advocate. He was a tireless fighter for the rights of GLBT citizens, the homeless, immigrants, wounded soldiers and just about anyone else whose voice wasn’t being heard. He was an honest politician who sought to bring civility to Parliament. As his state funeral showed, he was a man who touched many lives.

He was also a powerful rallying figure for those who know that this country of ours is being steered in the wrong direction and want to turn the wheel sharply away from its present course. The enthusiasm of many who’ve vowed to carry on his tasks of activism and advocacy hasn’t quite hit me. It’s been patchy. But I’ve been also thrown into a bit of a worry-and-frustration-induced depression. Reality-induced funk, I guess.

It’s not just the slashing of Environment Canada jobs, the lack of whistleblower protection, the justification of $1 billion in expenses for the Toronto G8 summit and excusing of horrible police violence and unconstitutional mass arrests, the elimination of the Canadian Long Form Census, the blatant lie that crime rates are increasing being used to justify the construction of US-style megaprisons, the exorbitant expenditure on overpriced and untested single-engine fighter jets (I’ll say that what this country really needs in terms of home military equipment spending is a modernized Navy and Coast Guard), the “it’s the economy, stupid” claims of economic success in a petrostate with booming oil-prices (Canada’s economy has become a resource-extraction-based one), the refusal to answer media questions, “But That’s Simply Not True…”, the massive expansion of the tar sands and invite to foreign oil companies to make a mess they won’t ever have to clean up, the abyssmal conditions of Native reserves, the slashing of social spending, the falsifying of documents by a senior minister, or the Canadian Taliban-esque social conservatism that occasionally bursts through the background noise like a demented SETI signal broadcasting “Screw you all! We’re not only content with wrecking the environment but we’ll wreck all of your sinning, criminal lives to boot because that’s the way things were intended”

No, it’s not just that. It’s also the media’s cowardice in failing to press Harper even when he restricted them to five questions per day. It’s the chilling political climate this country’s taking on. It’s the rise of right-wing politicians who gut city and provincial treasuries like human locusts by slashing their tax base and handing out unscrutinized contracts to their friends.

It’s also the anger these politicans turn into a carefully directed hate and rise to power on, and it’s the fact that many among their electorate are cheering them on the entire time.

The other side never takes a day off from steering the reins in their direction. The struggle continues. We’ve got our work cut out for us. Thank you Jack. We lost a great fighter, rallier, inspiration and human being. Vires in Numeris. Let’s roll.

20
Dec
10

En Cas d’Amour…


A piece which I installed in front of a vacant lot on St. Laurent Boulevard in Montreal, near the St. Laurent/Fairmount intersection. The fronting of the lot with several 1/2″ plywood panels to create posterable space that hides the lot from view is a design feature I’ve seen in several other places around the city.

I’m really interested in the idea of creating variations of safety and public awareness posters, signs and installations along the line of the “IN CASE OF FIRE BREAK GLASS” or “IF YOU SEE SOMETHING SUSPICIOUS, SAY SOMETHING” that are ever-present in certain areas to the degree that we simply tune them out.

12
Jul
10

Portrait of the Artist as a Young Mack

Well, I put up perhaps the most fun piece of streetart I’ve ever done today.

Back in May, a friend and I had his little 2-year-old son paint a picture on some paper with a bunch of fingerpaints. The idea, as I saw it, would be to hang this picture somewhere in downtown Montreal as an example of ‘high art’. Art galleries in a number of cities- the ex-Ottawa Portrait Gallery being among them- periodically bring out some of their work and display it at a street level during festivals or special events.

Well, I borrowed the gold frame idea from the Urban Curators Project and today we went out to hang up his masterpiece…

And here we are… Frame, plexiglass and wire were found on garbage-day back in late April and assembled together last night. Since Mack’s favourite thing in the whole wide world is indeed apple juice, that’s what he chose to name his magnum opus.

And here’s Mack himself at his vernissage…

Hamming it up for the cameras…

02
May
10

Street charettes and crumbling concrete

Where to go from here? That’s a question which I’ve been asking myself for a good couple of months.

As you already know, I’ve written a fair bit over the past few months about the potential for a merger of street art and urban design or planning. I’m currently an urban planning student working towards a graduate degree in the field, and I’ve been dwelling on the topic of how to merge my hobby with my future profession for almost two years now. The field of planning is unfortunately too much of a formal and stilted one, and it needs to have some life breathed into it…

I’ve also featured a number of awesome streetart projects (like the Urban Repair Squad) that draw attention to urban problems and others that take a DIY-style approach to fixing some of them in a creative and interesting way.
(I’ve recently discovered the photography and urban installations of Claudia Ficca and David Luciano, in which creative uses are made of some of Montreal’s many potholes. Check it out)

(photo by rllayman on Flickr, from Ficca and Luciano’s “Pothole” exhibition.)

One issue which I’m interested in exploring this summer is the potential for street pieces to gather public input and ideas on future civic plans, expansions and repairs. I’ve got a couple ideas for streetart charettes buzzing around in the far corners of my mind, and I’ll see what comes of them as the next couple of days or weeks go by. As well, Montreal is a city in a constant state of disrepair, with some parts (like the crumbling Turcot Interchange) in a more advanced and unpleasant state than others. Crumbling infrastructure almost seems to scream out for a cheeky Banksyesque stencil or wheatpaste intervention or two. More to come…

01
Mar
10

A new story-book…

A little something I put up on Mont-Royal St. around the Henri-Julien area in anticipation of Nuit Blanche. I’ll head back that way soon and see how it’s been used (and hopefully have an update to share)
How was Nuit Blanche for you folks? I simply could not let Nuit Blanche go by without adding some art of my own to the fray. I saw quite a bit of interesting and thought-provoking art (and I’ll try to share my thoughts on it all with my next update)…


wakka wakka wakka
inside the book

26
Oct
09

Stories to be told…

More of the Tell Me a Story project, by yours truly…

More stories to come…as of now I’m dealing with schoolwork and working on a street art piece about Swine Flu (or, as they say in French, “la grippe-cochon” :D)





Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.